Posts Tagged Mold

Stone Veneers

Many of us are familiar with Exterior Insulated Finishing Systems (EIFS), the stucco look finish applied to homes as a siding material. When it first hit the commercial scene around 1969 it was a cost effective and flexible design with a greater environmental benefit than other claddings. Unfortunately the installation is precise and far too many contractors were installing it incorrectly. Many failures occurred, and when it hit the residential scene homes suffered (and still do) from moisture intrusion which leads to fungi and mold issues. An associate showed us pictures of a home less than a year old that had mushrooms already growing in the walls! Now for the bad news…….

Adhered Concrete Masonry Veneers (ACMV) is the new bad boy on the block. Although it has an appealing look, like that of an old stone house, it should be treated as a stucco finish and all the trouble associated with EIFS will pale in comparison as the clock runs. Mark Parlee says in the Journal of Light Construction magazine, “…ACMV…will make the EIFS problems look like a drop in the bucket.” Again, it’s not that the material is a problem, it’s the installation. When an inspector sees EIFS and now ACMV, it is a red flag and further evaluation is almost the rule of thumb. Mark is an expert in exterior remediation and his well written article delves into the factors contributing to the failures and what can, or should be done. Too often the home is occupied and the occupants may already be suffering from poor air quality issues directly related to the moisture issues caused by ACMV.

Repairs can run into the tens of thousands of dollars if these issues have gotten out of hand. So what can a homeowner do? If you are shopping for a home, pay particular attention to (or insist that your inspector does) the exterior finish. Read up on what to look for. Since curb appeal is such a great seller, it is sometimes hard to look deeper. Most of us like the stone look…classy.

Because the stone itself can hold moisture, a good drainage system between the veneer and the framing is essential as it prevents the moisture from being drawn into the house. Short of a forensic analysis however, you may not be able to tell what the sub finish is, but there are things you can look for. If you are unsure have a qualified ASHI Home Inspector check it out for you.

1- Does the veneer (either EIFS or ACMV) have clearance at the bottom? A minimum of 2” is recommended above hard surfaces and more at an earth grade. It should NOT be below the mulch or the finish grade and an appropriate weep screed needs to be doing its job.
2- Where roofs abut vertical walls an appropriate ‘kick out’ flashing should be installed.
3- Check and maintain caulk and sealing around doors and windows.
4- Tops of walls, inside corners and rake returns are other culprits.
5- Is any lath visible between the stones?

You need not have several faults to have an issue. Even one fault in the siding can have unwanted consequences. Do yourself a huge favor and look/ask before buying and look/fix if you are already an owner.

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Winter Indoor Air Quality.

All the windows are closed and the doors are shut. We are in the midst of winter and trying to get the most out of our heating systems since to date, no one I know is giving away heating oil. For those of us with wood or coal stoves our problems can run from layers of dust to dry skin, not to mention that we are maintaining a fire in our homes! For homes with boilers, as long as the system was checked you should be in good shape. However, most of the homes I inspect have furnaces and constant air movement can cause its own set of circumstances.

 If the air quality in your home is questionable, recirculating air through a furnace can perpetuate a host of issues. Molds and allergens, if present will not just go away unless you take steps to keep them at bay. While high humidity usually isn’t a problem, improperly vented clothes dryers and bathroom fans can add high levels of moisture. Maintaining humidity levels below 50% can help here. Some furnaces have humidifiers that add moisture to the air as it leaves the furnace. These are often neglected and if there is fungus in the unit or in the ductwork, what you are doing is moving those spores through the home. The same holds true for Heat Pumps which are even more neglected. The same ductwork for the air conditioning is used for heat and since there are usually no service contracts for Heat Pumps they are often left alone until they need repair.

 Air filters need to be changes frequently. If allowed to accumulate dirt, not only does your furnace have to work harder but you are potentially forcing dirt, dust and lint along with spores and allergens through the building over and over. Invariably many people get sicker during the winter months. Add more people and you add more issues. You can of course, tell everyone to not visit during the holidays but most of us enjoy hosting friends and family.

 High humidity not only is a prerequisite for mold growth it can also foster an environment for dust mites. The flip side is not enough humidity. Again, allergy issues in a too dry environment can cause sore throats, sniffles, dry skin and poor sleep. We have to strike a balance for better health.

 Until we can once again open our windows and allow fresh air back in, we need to be aware that our homes can kill us. Change your filters, maintain humidity between 30% and 50% and vacuum often. If your air quality is poor or someone is suffering continually, get you home checked!

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Mold & IAQ Part 2

I sat down last night before our show came on and decided to peruse one of the Internet forums on a ‘mold’ discussion.  It’s amazing the controversy around this issue.  Some claim it’s all snake oil and others insist it’s valid.  OK, so the EPA says mold is a potential problem and just because they say it is doesn’t mean the Lemmings get in line and go off a cliff, http://www.epa.gov/mold/ nor does it mean that you put your head in the sand and pretend that it doesn’t affect people.

An education isn’t how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It’s being able to differentiate between what you know and what you don’t.
Anatole France

So let’s educate ourselves!  The unfortunate truth is some people really do have an issue with the presence of mold and if they do then it needs to be dealt with.  The first thing that should be recommended to a client is, “Have you seen a doctor about your sensitivity to mold?”

Some of the snake charmers will take any money they can talk you out of, taking advantage of the naive or simply jumping on the hype bandwagon and scaring the client, stating the worst possible scenarios.  Simply put, if you see mold then you probably have a mold issue. The most common remediation for mold is to eliminate the source of moisture.  Since mold never really goes away eliminating moisture usually will stop it from growing. Once you stop it from growing then it can be cleaned up or your physical issues may improve.

If you can smell mold or musty air and can’t see anything then you should have the air tested, have a full mold inspection performed, or both.  Avoid companies that test and remediate.  That could be a conflict of interest.  I am a Certified Mold Inspector and a Certified Remediation Contractor. I do NOT do remediation but prefer to only do the testing.  As a Home Inspector I do not offer repairs even though I have been a carpenter for 33 years.  I may give a client several contractors to choose from or refer them to the Chamber of Commerce.

With the rainy season coming and as things thaw, moisture will start to seep in unwanted areas of your home. Be aware of changes in your health or the health of children or seniors.  If mold rears its ugly head be prepared, know what to look for and have someone to call…..me!

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Is that Hot Tub Safe?

When I was a young lad working in construction, the first job I worked on was the Bellevue Stratford right after the first known outbreak of Legionnaires Disease happened and killed 34 people.  In 1977, Dr. Joseph McDade discovered a new bacterium, which was identified as the causative organism.  Named after the American Legion gathering that took place in Philly it has become widely known as Legionella.

‘Legionella’ is a type of aerobic bacteria that causes a potentially fatal infectious disease that affects the respiratory system and can cause fever, pneumonia and acute influenza.  A milder strain of this is called Pontiac Fever. There are at least 40 species that occur naturally in the environment. Typically Legionella can take up to 2 weeks to develop but the milder strain (Pontiac Fever) can show symptoms in just 2 hours.

What you NEED to know is where it can grow and take precautions to prevent exposure and possible infection.   The list of water systems that have been known to harbor the Legionella bacteria is extensive.  However, today we are talking about Hot Tubs, a place where Legionella grows easily.

Warm water provides an ideal environment for the bacteria to thrive.  It’s not necessary to be in the water.  Just standing near moist infected water can cause a person to contract the disease.  The aerated water can make this likely to happen although any water source can become infected, even your house shower.

In Hot Tubs the chemical balance needs to be maintained and as they say, “The more the merrier” can translate to, “The more people the more chances.”  Hot Tubs that are not routinely cleaned and maintained  are potential health threats.   Of course we expect Hotels and Commercial Spas to maintain their equipment properly and we can’t know if they do, but you can keep your own Hot Tub safe.

EMSL Analytical Inc. says, “The unit should not be run using untreated tap water. Proper maintenance includes not only treating the water but also shutting down the unit weekly to scrub away any biofilm deposits on the sides of the unit and cleaning/replacing the filters.  The unit should then be refilled using tap water treated with the correct dosing of water treatment chemicals.”

 It’s not just the water!

 Don’t forget to check and clean the filters on a regular basis too.  Recommendations are to keep several sets of filters available so each set can be thoroughly dried after cleaning.

Higher risk individuals are of course, my age group (over 50), Smokers (current or former), people with chronic lung disease (such as emphysema and chronic asthma) and individuals with weakened immune systems, to name a few.

Testing is available and if you have any question about your Hot Tub, please get it checked and avoid that great deal on a Hot Tub that has been sitting on your neighbor’s lawn all winter that says, “For Sale”

Check out; http://yourhottubandspas.co/running/hot-tub-and-spa-chemicals/

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Mold & Indoor Air Quality – Part 1

A friend of mine enjoys watching termites, says they are fascinating.  I like mold for the same reasons but watching mold isn’t quite as much fun.  I was browsing through the Journal of Light Construction magazine that I subscribe to and they went through a 30 year recap of their publication.  I found “Mold” listed throughout.

In their very first issue in 1982 they say, “NEB (New England Builder, their first official name) takes on energy issues, like moisture problems from increased insulation and the role of roof ventilation.”

In 1983, “Poorly installed vapor barriers spawning mold and lawsuits”

1987, “More moisture problems, this time in tight houses and crawlspaces”

1989, “Builders report more moisture problems as houses get tighter”

1991, “First ‘sick building syndrome’ suit settled out of court”

1997, “Mixed-climate moisture control is complicated, drying potential to the interior/exterior studied”

1998, “Toxic mold plagues homeowners, delights media and litigators”

2001, “Mold lawsuits bankrupt big builder; ‘stachybotrys’ becomes a household word”

2011, “JLC author uses infrared camera to find moisture problems as well as energy leaks”

As you can see, mold is a big issue and one of the foremost magazines is keeping up to date with the developments.  It’s a problem that isn’t going to go away, at least anytime soon.  You can’t just look away. *start scary movie music* Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.  Some people are sensitive to molds. For these people, exposure to molds can cause symptoms such as nasal stuffiness, eye irritation, wheezing, or skin irritation. Some people, such as those with serious allergies to molds, may have more severe reactions.

If you have any of these symptoms, see or smell mold, it may be a good time to have your Indoor Air Quality tested.  It just so happens I can take care of this for you, I am now a Certified Mold Inspector.  Don’t suffer needlessly.

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