Posts Tagged moisture

Mold & IAQ Part 2

I sat down last night before our show came on and decided to peruse one of the Internet forums on a ‘mold’ discussion.  It’s amazing the controversy around this issue.  Some claim it’s all snake oil and others insist it’s valid.  OK, so the EPA says mold is a potential problem and just because they say it is doesn’t mean the Lemmings get in line and go off a cliff, http://www.epa.gov/mold/ nor does it mean that you put your head in the sand and pretend that it doesn’t affect people.

An education isn’t how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It’s being able to differentiate between what you know and what you don’t.
Anatole France

So let’s educate ourselves!  The unfortunate truth is some people really do have an issue with the presence of mold and if they do then it needs to be dealt with.  The first thing that should be recommended to a client is, “Have you seen a doctor about your sensitivity to mold?”

Some of the snake charmers will take any money they can talk you out of, taking advantage of the naive or simply jumping on the hype bandwagon and scaring the client, stating the worst possible scenarios.  Simply put, if you see mold then you probably have a mold issue. The most common remediation for mold is to eliminate the source of moisture.  Since mold never really goes away eliminating moisture usually will stop it from growing. Once you stop it from growing then it can be cleaned up or your physical issues may improve.

If you can smell mold or musty air and can’t see anything then you should have the air tested, have a full mold inspection performed, or both.  Avoid companies that test and remediate.  That could be a conflict of interest.  I am a Certified Mold Inspector and a Certified Remediation Contractor. I do NOT do remediation but prefer to only do the testing.  As a Home Inspector I do not offer repairs even though I have been a carpenter for 33 years.  I may give a client several contractors to choose from or refer them to the Chamber of Commerce.

With the rainy season coming and as things thaw, moisture will start to seep in unwanted areas of your home. Be aware of changes in your health or the health of children or seniors.  If mold rears its ugly head be prepared, know what to look for and have someone to call…..me!

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Is that Hot Tub Safe?

When I was a young lad working in construction, the first job I worked on was the Bellevue Stratford right after the first known outbreak of Legionnaires Disease happened and killed 34 people.  In 1977, Dr. Joseph McDade discovered a new bacterium, which was identified as the causative organism.  Named after the American Legion gathering that took place in Philly it has become widely known as Legionella.

‘Legionella’ is a type of aerobic bacteria that causes a potentially fatal infectious disease that affects the respiratory system and can cause fever, pneumonia and acute influenza.  A milder strain of this is called Pontiac Fever. There are at least 40 species that occur naturally in the environment. Typically Legionella can take up to 2 weeks to develop but the milder strain (Pontiac Fever) can show symptoms in just 2 hours.

What you NEED to know is where it can grow and take precautions to prevent exposure and possible infection.   The list of water systems that have been known to harbor the Legionella bacteria is extensive.  However, today we are talking about Hot Tubs, a place where Legionella grows easily.

Warm water provides an ideal environment for the bacteria to thrive.  It’s not necessary to be in the water.  Just standing near moist infected water can cause a person to contract the disease.  The aerated water can make this likely to happen although any water source can become infected, even your house shower.

In Hot Tubs the chemical balance needs to be maintained and as they say, “The more the merrier” can translate to, “The more people the more chances.”  Hot Tubs that are not routinely cleaned and maintained  are potential health threats.   Of course we expect Hotels and Commercial Spas to maintain their equipment properly and we can’t know if they do, but you can keep your own Hot Tub safe.

EMSL Analytical Inc. says, “The unit should not be run using untreated tap water. Proper maintenance includes not only treating the water but also shutting down the unit weekly to scrub away any biofilm deposits on the sides of the unit and cleaning/replacing the filters.  The unit should then be refilled using tap water treated with the correct dosing of water treatment chemicals.”

 It’s not just the water!

 Don’t forget to check and clean the filters on a regular basis too.  Recommendations are to keep several sets of filters available so each set can be thoroughly dried after cleaning.

Higher risk individuals are of course, my age group (over 50), Smokers (current or former), people with chronic lung disease (such as emphysema and chronic asthma) and individuals with weakened immune systems, to name a few.

Testing is available and if you have any question about your Hot Tub, please get it checked and avoid that great deal on a Hot Tub that has been sitting on your neighbor’s lawn all winter that says, “For Sale”

Check out; http://yourhottubandspas.co/running/hot-tub-and-spa-chemicals/

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Mold & Indoor Air Quality – Part 1

A friend of mine enjoys watching termites, says they are fascinating.  I like mold for the same reasons but watching mold isn’t quite as much fun.  I was browsing through the Journal of Light Construction magazine that I subscribe to and they went through a 30 year recap of their publication.  I found “Mold” listed throughout.

In their very first issue in 1982 they say, “NEB (New England Builder, their first official name) takes on energy issues, like moisture problems from increased insulation and the role of roof ventilation.”

In 1983, “Poorly installed vapor barriers spawning mold and lawsuits”

1987, “More moisture problems, this time in tight houses and crawlspaces”

1989, “Builders report more moisture problems as houses get tighter”

1991, “First ‘sick building syndrome’ suit settled out of court”

1997, “Mixed-climate moisture control is complicated, drying potential to the interior/exterior studied”

1998, “Toxic mold plagues homeowners, delights media and litigators”

2001, “Mold lawsuits bankrupt big builder; ‘stachybotrys’ becomes a household word”

2011, “JLC author uses infrared camera to find moisture problems as well as energy leaks”

As you can see, mold is a big issue and one of the foremost magazines is keeping up to date with the developments.  It’s a problem that isn’t going to go away, at least anytime soon.  You can’t just look away. *start scary movie music* Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.  Some people are sensitive to molds. For these people, exposure to molds can cause symptoms such as nasal stuffiness, eye irritation, wheezing, or skin irritation. Some people, such as those with serious allergies to molds, may have more severe reactions.

If you have any of these symptoms, see or smell mold, it may be a good time to have your Indoor Air Quality tested.  It just so happens I can take care of this for you, I am now a Certified Mold Inspector.  Don’t suffer needlessly.

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VENTILATION.

If you have to go in your attic for something this time of year, the heat is unforgiving.  Besides trying to get out as soon as possible you should be thinking about ventilation and, “Do I have enough?”

Minimum recommended attic ventilation is 1 Sq Foot for every 300 Sq Feet of attic area.  Multiplying the length by the width of your home should give you the area.  You should have as much intake ventilation as exhaust ventilation.  Truth is you can’t have too much ventilation if you stick to the 50/50 rule.  50% intake under the eaves and 50% exhaust at or near the roof peak.  However, most homes have too little.  So what’s the big deal?

When I do a home inspection I’m on the warpath for moisture.  We often think of moisture in the form of rain or groundwater and these are culprits but moisture in the form of humidity can be just as evil.  Moisture in improperly ventilated attics can cause mold, mildew and rot.  Higher temperatures can shorten the life span of building materials like your roof.  Ventilation is just as important in the cold months too, but the hot weather can bring it to the forefront of our thinking, especially if you have to go “up there.”

Gable roofs are the easiest to ventilate because they have the longest ridges.  Hip roofs are more of a challenge as are Mansard roofs. Dormers create their own set of challenges.  Surprisingly many builders don’t understand proper ventilation and sometimes opt for the cheapest way to “Git-R-Done.”

A good Home Inspector should be looking at the attic ventilation as part of the overall picture.  If you are not planning on a home inspection in the near future, pick a cooler day and take a good look at your attic ventilation.  You can save money and costly repairs by simply increasing it.

A source of good information on ventilation is Lomanco.

Stay cool!

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