Posts Tagged maintenance

Stone Veneers

Many of us are familiar with Exterior Insulated Finishing Systems (EIFS), the stucco look finish applied to homes as a siding material. When it first hit the commercial scene around 1969 it was a cost effective and flexible design with a greater environmental benefit than other claddings. Unfortunately the installation is precise and far too many contractors were installing it incorrectly. Many failures occurred, and when it hit the residential scene homes suffered (and still do) from moisture intrusion which leads to fungi and mold issues. An associate showed us pictures of a home less than a year old that had mushrooms already growing in the walls! Now for the bad news…….

Adhered Concrete Masonry Veneers (ACMV) is the new bad boy on the block. Although it has an appealing look, like that of an old stone house, it should be treated as a stucco finish and all the trouble associated with EIFS will pale in comparison as the clock runs. Mark Parlee says in the Journal of Light Construction magazine, “…ACMV…will make the EIFS problems look like a drop in the bucket.” Again, it’s not that the material is a problem, it’s the installation. When an inspector sees EIFS and now ACMV, it is a red flag and further evaluation is almost the rule of thumb. Mark is an expert in exterior remediation and his well written article delves into the factors contributing to the failures and what can, or should be done. Too often the home is occupied and the occupants may already be suffering from poor air quality issues directly related to the moisture issues caused by ACMV.

Repairs can run into the tens of thousands of dollars if these issues have gotten out of hand. So what can a homeowner do? If you are shopping for a home, pay particular attention to (or insist that your inspector does) the exterior finish. Read up on what to look for. Since curb appeal is such a great seller, it is sometimes hard to look deeper. Most of us like the stone look…classy.

Because the stone itself can hold moisture, a good drainage system between the veneer and the framing is essential as it prevents the moisture from being drawn into the house. Short of a forensic analysis however, you may not be able to tell what the sub finish is, but there are things you can look for. If you are unsure have a qualified ASHI Home Inspector check it out for you.

1- Does the veneer (either EIFS or ACMV) have clearance at the bottom? A minimum of 2” is recommended above hard surfaces and more at an earth grade. It should NOT be below the mulch or the finish grade and an appropriate weep screed needs to be doing its job.
2- Where roofs abut vertical walls an appropriate ‘kick out’ flashing should be installed.
3- Check and maintain caulk and sealing around doors and windows.
4- Tops of walls, inside corners and rake returns are other culprits.
5- Is any lath visible between the stones?

You need not have several faults to have an issue. Even one fault in the siding can have unwanted consequences. Do yourself a huge favor and look/ask before buying and look/fix if you are already an owner.

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Ahh…..Spring Time.

It’s the time of the year when the daffodils and tulips are blooming.  Thoughts turn to tending to the yard and getting outside!  Of course, for some of us it’s still a bit nippy but our thoughts are outside anyway.  So…what’s it gonna be this year?  Maybe you will plant a new tree, or install a pond out front or a new bird feeder?  Whatever you are planning make a few simple smart decisions first!

Ground services, electric, water, cable, gas, etc. are all supposed to be buried a safe distance underground so that shovel you are using doesn’t hit anything.  Even so, not everything is done right. So if you are planning to plant anything, even a bird feeder, make sure you are not digging over anything that can endanger you.  Check with your township for the phone number of the utility companies’ services that will usually come and locate these service lines for free.  It’s in their best interest to not have you hurt and way cheaper for them to not have to repair anything.

Many of us live in rural locations and often we do know where most things are. Except for the septic and water, the utilities are above ground.  This does NOT mean that we know it all.  Abandoned wells, cisterns or oil tanks may have been waiting all these years to deteriorate and have chosen 2013 to show themselves.  Use caution!

If you live in a development or other building lot where utilities are buried you need to take even more care.  Like I said, in a perfect world utilities are installed correctly….usually.  I have uncovered cable lines only a few inches underground.  They were conveniently installed on the property line or partially in the wooded area and I guess the knuckleheads figured no one would dig there. Wrong!  If it’s my property I may choose to plant bamboo or some other separation along the border.

To make things worse anyone can buy a small backhoe and then things can get even more dangerous.  Newer homes have lawn sprinklers and these will be near the surface. Some retrofitted gas lines for a barbeque may be only inches underground.  Buried propane tanks have a small line often just below the surface.

I visited a local restaurant where they allowed parking on the lawn.  No one thought to protect the top of the buried propane tank and it was damaged TWICE!  Fortunately no one was hurt.

Accidents are just that….accidents.  We don’t plan them (unless you are working for the mob).  So take a little time and use common sense and take advantage of the free services offered by the utilities.  Have your property surveyed.  It may save your life or the life of someone close to you.  And…enjoy the warmer weather!

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Mold & Indoor Air Quality – Part 1

A friend of mine enjoys watching termites, says they are fascinating.  I like mold for the same reasons but watching mold isn’t quite as much fun.  I was browsing through the Journal of Light Construction magazine that I subscribe to and they went through a 30 year recap of their publication.  I found “Mold” listed throughout.

In their very first issue in 1982 they say, “NEB (New England Builder, their first official name) takes on energy issues, like moisture problems from increased insulation and the role of roof ventilation.”

In 1983, “Poorly installed vapor barriers spawning mold and lawsuits”

1987, “More moisture problems, this time in tight houses and crawlspaces”

1989, “Builders report more moisture problems as houses get tighter”

1991, “First ‘sick building syndrome’ suit settled out of court”

1997, “Mixed-climate moisture control is complicated, drying potential to the interior/exterior studied”

1998, “Toxic mold plagues homeowners, delights media and litigators”

2001, “Mold lawsuits bankrupt big builder; ‘stachybotrys’ becomes a household word”

2011, “JLC author uses infrared camera to find moisture problems as well as energy leaks”

As you can see, mold is a big issue and one of the foremost magazines is keeping up to date with the developments.  It’s a problem that isn’t going to go away, at least anytime soon.  You can’t just look away. *start scary movie music* Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma, and other respiratory complaints.  Some people are sensitive to molds. For these people, exposure to molds can cause symptoms such as nasal stuffiness, eye irritation, wheezing, or skin irritation. Some people, such as those with serious allergies to molds, may have more severe reactions.

If you have any of these symptoms, see or smell mold, it may be a good time to have your Indoor Air Quality tested.  It just so happens I can take care of this for you, I am now a Certified Mold Inspector.  Don’t suffer needlessly.

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Moisture, moisture, moisture…

You’ve heard it before right here, unless you’re taking a shower or getting a drink of water you don’t need any extra moisture around the house.

Its spring and we venture out doors now to enjoy our yards and gardens and whatever else you like.

As an aside you may glance back and up at your house in one of those routine look-a-bouts to see how the house fared during the winter.  Small trees are growing out of your gutters and there is black soot and staining on the siding.  You remember saying to yourself in the fall that you were going to clean the gutters but something happened…. Oh yeah…. It was football season.  So now it needs desperate attention.  Off to the shed…

First thing is be careful… well first thing is to dig through the shed and find the ladder.  If you liked ladders it would have been done already, so don’t get sidetracked yet, the mower can wait.

Whatever type of ladder you use, an extension, “A” frame or if the gutters are low enough maybe a pair of saw horses and a plank just be careful.  Figure on needing a few heavy contractor bags for the debris depending on what’s growing around the house.  Don’t figure because you don’t have trees that there is no junk in the gutters.  Granules from the shingles accumulate and birds, squirrels and even that kid down the street that lost his tennis ball can affect your special place.  Scoop out what you can before you hose them out.  If you system empties into an underground system you have more work to do.  Disconnect the downspout and clean them, THEN make sure the underground system is clean.  Run a hose through it and check the discharge point.

 

 

 Actual photo – not a dramatization!

Usually you can lean the ladder against the gutters themselves but use caution.  I know… I’m starting to sound like you mom… sorry.  The point is that gutters should be cleaned twice a year or more depending on your particular layout.  Neglecting this WILL mean that moisture will end up too close to the building and bigger issues will develop.

Get it done now before baseball get rolling.  I’ll remind you again in the fall.

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